Category Archives: Romance Novel

Interview with July Cumming

1) What makes erotica different from Romance?

Romance almost always has a happy ending. If it doesn’t, it should at the least, have a happy for now feeling by the time it ends. Romance stirs up the reader’s emotions, whereas erotica will stir up that as well as other things. There doesn’t have to be sex scenes in romance. It can be nonexistent, implied or it can get hot and heavy, but it isn’t necessary to move the plot forward.

Erotica, on the other hand, must have sex scenes in order to make it an erotica story. A well-written erotica will have character development and a plot, not just vivid sex scenes. Erotica should be arousing for the reader. It should make you tingle in all the right places and romance should give you that tingle in your heart.

Continue reading Interview with July Cumming

Romance heroines enjoy sexual freedom like never before. Do they?

Romance is in my veins. I started devouring Harlequin novels in Brazil when I was thirteen, and at the age of eighteen I was translating them. Then, years later, I parted my ways with romance to dedicate my reading time exclusively to “serious” literature.

When I decided to write my first novel, though, there was no question it would be romance. While working on RED: A Love Story, I reconnected with the genre and read a number of erotic novels for reference. I was surprised at how things had changed since I last held a steamy book in my hands: now things were bold, kinky, edgy. Hot hot hot!  Continue reading Romance heroines enjoy sexual freedom like never before. Do they?

Historically accurate fantasies.

Thanks again to R. Harrison for giving us some insight into his writing process! Writing historical fiction (especially historical romance!) is a gift, one that obviously requires a great deal of research that I, personally, don’t think I’d have the patience for.

Well, maybe if it was set in ancient Greece.

One of the pluses of being an Aspie is having great focus on things that interest me. I have always had a fascination with ancient cultures, particularly since I was about 12 and had a recurring dream that I was born on the island of Atlantis shortly before it sank. Continue reading Historically accurate fantasies.

In Times Past.

Historical fiction and historical romance bring their own set of problems for an author. As an author I’m the only and supreme authority on my science-fiction world so what I say goes. If I’m writing in the current day, then my knowledge of idioms and manners is as good as anyone’s. Except I might have to research a sub-culture, but I can usually find someone who is a member of it to check that I’ve got it right. I might, of course, have to be a little careful about approaching the local chapter of the Hell’s angels for my motorcycle gang book, but that’s a minor distraction. Continue reading In Times Past.

On Romance…

or the structure of a romantic story and why it matters.

The basic form of a romance story is surprisingly simple. Boy being meets girl being, or more often girl being meets boy being, and after some complications they wander off under the light of the setting moon with a happy ever after ending. Or at least happy ever after, for now. With such a simple plot, one descended almost intact from Homer (the wily Odysseus overcomes many obstacles to be reunited with his faithful dog Argos. Oh and his wife Penelope), romance seems a trivially easy thing to write.

Romance may be trivial to write, but it’s not trivial to write well. Continue reading On Romance…